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Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Sun Sep 11, 2005 8:09 pm
by Cibo
ausgehen = to go out (eg. candle, fire, light) or to go out (e.g. for diner, with friends), to run short of sth. (eg money, fuel)
rausgehen = short form for herausgehen = to go out of sth. (eg. a house), to leave sth.
Gehen Sie raus! = Go out!
Gehen Sie aus! = makes no sense at all in this case (Go on a date! Party! O_o)
Trust the native speaker. Gehen Sie raus! is correct :nodyes

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Mon Sep 12, 2005 5:04 pm
by Angelique
Yes, I know that. Which is why I had found that scene a bit confusing.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 6:17 pm
by StarChild
Wow...thanks, Bamfette...I am writing a story!!! You have been more than helpful!:)

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 8:57 pm
by CircusElfe
Originally posted by Angelique
First of all, it's "Gehen Sie aus," not "raus."
Also, I suppose it would stand to reason that Kurt would not speak perfect Hochdeutsch, being Bavarian. But since I'm not familiar with Bayern Dialekt, I can't really say. :?



hu??? No no no... not even in Bavaria they would say "Gehen sie aus" that would mean. "get switched off" but not "get out"

Get out still means "Gehen Sie raus"

And please: do a native German a favour and spell "Goethe" right.. he deserves his name spelled right.... or I will start and quote Schakesbear ;)

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:37 pm
by Angelique
I thought we had already settled that. As for Göthe vs. Goethe, I have seen the same name spelled both ways acceptably in literary and musical sources.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 9:41 pm
by StarChild
Yep, Angelique, I heard it "aus", too...and I have watched the movie several times over now...:D

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 10:06 pm
by Angelique
Well, then there's the matter of my mild hearing impairment, too. That combined with a swallowed "r" means I'm not as likely to hear it correctly. But I tend not to mistake an "oe" for an umlauted o.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Mon Dec 05, 2005 10:17 pm
by Crocodile Hunter
Alkuperäinen postittaja CircusElfe
Originally posted by Angelique
First of all, it's "Gehen Sie aus," not "raus."
Also, I suppose it would stand to reason that Kurt would not speak perfect Hochdeutsch, being Bavarian. But since I'm not familiar with Bayern Dialekt, I can't really say. :?



hu??? No no no... not even in Bavaria they would say "Gehen sie aus" that would mean. "get switched off" but not "get out"

Get out still means "Gehen Sie raus"

And please: do a native German a favour and spell "Goethe" right.. he deserves his name spelled right.... or I will start and quote Schakesbear ;)


hmm babelfish translator says "gehen sie raus" means
"get out". But you are the german. (while watching the church scene i heard it raus).

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2005 12:14 am
by fallacy
hallo folks,


i also hear *raus* not *aus* :-/

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2005 2:26 am
by HoodedMan
Originally posted by Crocodile Hunter
hmm babelfish translator says "gehen sie raus" means
"get out". But you are the german. (while watching the church scene i heard it raus).


That's exactly what Angelique said, that "Gehen Sie raus" meant "get out" and "Gehen Sie aus" does not. I think that matter's settled.

Originally posted by Angelique
Well, then there's the matter of my mild hearing impairment, too. That combined with a swallowed "r" means I'm not as likely to hear it correctly. But I tend not to mistake an "oe" for an umlauted o.


Spelling it 'oe' instead of ö is perfect German, Angelique. It's most commonly in use by people who do not have a keyboard that can type an umlauted character or do not know how to. It's also perfectly fine in writing, though an umlaut is preferred.

I would make sure you check your facts before criticising someone else's spelling, CircusElfe and Angelique, lest you appear uninformed. Just my two cents, not a directive.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2005 3:09 am
by Angelique
^Oh, I know that- about oe's and umlauts. Had a professor named Schröder/Schroeder in university. He wasn't picky about the spelling, nor even about the pronunciation- though he was happy if anyone made an attempt at saying his name correctly.

And actually, I do think "gehen sie aus" does literally translate into "go out." But the context is different, of course, as "go out" is from "get out!" In the context he was using, "gehen sie aus" would not have been correct German. I knew that. And actually, I was not the first to point that out. I was pointing out how I heard it.
I confess I was mistaken about Kurt's first lines. While I was not the only one, it doesn't change the fact that I nonetheless heard them wrong. Can we leave it at that, please? Granted, I don't speak German anywhere near as well as I should, considering I grew up around the language. But I understand how sensitive people can be about mangling it. (Believe me, I grew up in the US with a last name that no one who didn't speak German or at least know psychology ever pronounced correctly.) And I am trying to improve.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2005 5:50 pm
by CircusElfe
Originally posted by HoodedMan
Originally posted by Crocodile Hunter
hmm babelfish translator says "gehen sie raus" means
"get out". But you are the german. (while watching the church scene i heard it raus).


That's exactly what Angelique said, that "Gehen Sie raus" meant "get out" and "Gehen Sie aus" does not. I think that matter's settled.

Originally posted by Angelique
Well, then there's the matter of my mild hearing impairment, too. That combined with a swallowed "r" means I'm not as likely to hear it correctly. But I tend not to mistake an "oe" for an umlauted o.


Spelling it 'oe' instead of ö is perfect German, Angelique. It's most commonly in use by people who do not have a keyboard that can type an umlauted character or do not know how to. It's also perfectly fine in writing, though an umlaut is preferred.

I would make sure you check your facts before criticising someone else's spelling, CircusElfe and Angelique, lest you appear uninformed. Just my two cents, not a directive.


Alright, I know I am new and my words didn't sound very friendly. I want to appologize for that. I am sorry... Also for having brought this topic up again. Actually I oversaw that there was a fourth page. It was my mistake completely. You can aswell delete them...

Still: believe me... I am not only born in Germany, not only am I German and speak that language since I can speak at all: Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is spelled that way. I have been to Weimar, I have written my graduation thesis about him. ... Goethe is a name... so you just cannot switch the Ö and OE as you like. Of course OE and Ö sounds the same. When you don't have an Ö on your keyboard you can replace it with an OE. No problem. Still Johann Wolfgang von Goethe is a NAME and you just cannot change it like you want. And he is spelled that way.

You were right, Angelique, I didn't check my facts, since I really didn't have to. Speling Goethe with OE is common sense to me. As I said, I had to deal very extensivly with his works.

But off course since I am a newbie (well not exactly since I have been posting here before a while back... anyway) you won't believe me.. so go to http://www.wikipedia.de and type in "Göthe" you will be asked if you meant "Goethe" actually and then you can read about him there. Wikipedia is btw the biggest German Online Almanac/Enzyclopedia around...

Sams happens when you are on http://www.infoplease.com when you type in "Göthe" you will see a "Did you mean Goethe"?

Well okay... sorry again for causing some haywire. I didn't mean to do it really. I always sound harsher than I want to sound. Probably due to my poor English.

Cheers!
Circus Elfe

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2005 6:15 pm
by Tyros
I will back you up on both Raus and Goethe. I definately heard raus, but maybe that is becuase it is the only phrase that makes sense so I did not even think it could be the other. As for Goethe vs Göthe, CircusElfe is correct. His name is Goethe and that is the way he and all Germans would spell it. There may be a few cases where it is spelled with a ö, but this not normal in Germany or Austria. I know that logically it seems that ö should be used, but in this case it just isn't, or at least is not the commonly accepted spelling. So don't pick on the native speaker for making a very correct correction.

hmmm just for an experiment I typed göthe into google and all the reaponses I got spelled it as Goethe.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2005 6:59 pm
by Angelique
Actually, I googled Göthe and even Johann Wolfgang von Göthe, and the name came up under both spellings. In quotation marks too, to ensure that google "knew" I was looking up those exact words. If the spelling was incorrect, I would have gotten the "make sure the spelling is correct" message.
And I majored in music, specializing in the singing of Lieder. Had to read Wilhelm Meister, etc., and I wasn't even specifically studying German literature. When I've seen German musical and literary sources spelling the same name different ways, you can understand why I'm going to chalk it up to the difference between Shakespeare and Shakespear. Or even, to use a musical example, Douuland and Dowland. As long as it's pronounced Doo-land, it's correct ;)
Certainly not as cringe-worthy as the ways I've constantly seen and heard my own name mangled throughout my life. (Or reading how English publishers insisted on calling Ludwig van Beethoven "Louis Beethoven.")

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2005 7:11 pm
by Tyros
Okay, well I suppose we can agree to disagree on this matter....

Side note: there is a simular debate in Wikipedia, unfortunatley not one that is resolved.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2005 9:31 pm
by CircusElfe
Originally posted by Tyros
Okay, well I suppose we can agree to disagree on this matter....

Side note: there is a simular debate in Wikipedia, unfortunatley not one that is resolved.


Yeah I guess we have to do that :) ([size=-3]Obwohl wir es natürlich besser wissen[/size]:whistle )

And thanks for backing me :D

Cheers!
Circus Elfe

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Tue Dec 06, 2005 10:27 pm
by HoodedMan
I don't know that there's any "backing" that needs to be done. All I was doing was pointing out that "Gehen Sie raus" vs. "Gehen Sie aus" has been pounded into the ground and that by majority consensus, it would seem to be "raus".

As for Goethe vs. Göthe, as you say, it is debatable; I tend to lean towards the fact that if you spell it either way, people know who you mean. I don't know that it's really resolvable, as many matters of German are not and Goethe can't really be called upon to provide his opinion.

Originally posted by CircusElfe
([size=-3]Obwohl wir es natürlich besser wissen[/size]:whistle )


Natürlich.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2005 12:11 am
by Angelique
(Obwohl wir es natürlich besser wissen:whistle )

Ich das verstehe.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2005 5:19 pm
by Cibo
I agree with CircusElfe, Goethe is a name and therefore should not be changed. For example someone called "Sophie" could not be written "Sofie" just like that only because it is pronounced the same (see also Stephen/Steffen, Hannah/Hanna, Stephanie/Stefanie). It would change the name and eventually might lead to mixing up people.
I guess in the case of Goethe we have the problem that he is so famous and his last name is so unique that everybody knows who is meant when you write either "Goethe" or "Göthe". But then you could also argue, why not leave out the "h" because it adds nothing to the pronouncation of the name, too.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Wed Dec 07, 2005 7:41 pm
by Angelique
Well, even when scholars (and even some of his contemporaries) are not in agreement, I don't think it's quite accurate to say one spelling definitely is his name and the other definitely is not. That's like saying Shakespear is an entirely different name than Shakespeare.
As for me, I never cared as much about how people spell my first name- as long as they actually got the name itself right (some people could only remember the first letter, and so I was often called Vanessa, Veronica, etc.,). I used to be much pickier about the last name, but only because my family was the target of a bit of racism on account of it pretty much from the time they got off the boat. (Immigration tried to force Anglicizing the name to help them "fit in.")

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 9:52 pm
by StarChild
Hey, Angelique...why does my German dictionary spell out "aus" ? Why all this stuff about "raus" as the proper pronunciation?? Also can you decipher your byline at the bottom of your screen for me? Is verspricht a form of the word promise? And I can't find horest in the Berlitz dictionary either.:?

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 10:15 pm
by Angelique
You are falling victim to the use of contractions, verb conjugations, and poetic, archaic stuff.

Raus is short for heraus.

My siggy means "And do you not hear what the Elfking softly promises me?"

Hörest is a second person conjugation of hören- to hear.

Verspricht is a third person conjugation of versprechen- to promise or assure.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 10:20 pm
by StarChild
Originally posted by Angelique
You are falling victim to the use of contractions, verb conjugations, and poetic, archaic stuff.

Raus is short for heraus.

My siggy means "And do you not hear what the Elfking softly promises me?"

Hörest is a second person conjugation of hören- to hear.

Verspricht is a third person conjugation of versprechen- to promise or assure.


Oi-vay!! I am going to love TRYING to learn German!! :faint

Danke, by the way! :wave

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 11:06 pm
by HoodedMan
You might not have found hörest because it's not the most common way to conjugate hören (either that or it's wrong; you never know with German.) The conjugation most commonly accepted is hörst.

Nightcrawler's German Translation guide

PostPosted: Wed Dec 28, 2005 11:17 pm
by Angelique
That's why I said hörest is a second person conjugation, rather than the one and only. And it's not incorrect. After all, I'm quoting it directly from the poem.